Law and society blog

Law Programme: Opening Doors

02.03.2017 17:31:24

The BA in Law programme offered by the School of Governance, Law and Society of Tallinn University is an excellent option for anyone thinking about an international career in law or in a field where legal knowledge is highly regarded and considered an asset.

Tallinn University is one of the few places where it is possible to specialise
in international law already during your undergraduate studies, yet at the same time the studies provide you with a strong foundation of the principles and main rules of domestic law. On the other hand, the law programme is also a great opportunity for Finnish and Estonian students that are interested in domestic law, yet want to study it in an international environment and in the English language. The BA in Law degree has already established a strong reputation thanks to the success of its alumni so the degree will open doors for you both in your home country and abroad.

Strengths of the programme

The programme provides a balance between learning fundamental legal rules and skills and allowing students to specialise in an area of law that is most exciting to them. The mandatory module of courses ensures basic knowledge of the legal systems on the different levels – domestic, European, international – and the two other modules (either European and international law or Finnish law, and the elective courses) guarantee that the students have a say in the details of their education. In addition, the international nature of the programme will enrich your experience with interaction with people (both students and lecturers) from different cultures and with diverse opinions.

Examples of courses offered

The programme does not just throw you in the deep end and hope that you will survive. Instead you begin with courses that give you the basic skills necessary and courses that do not require previous knowledge. For example, students start with a Legal Research and Writing course that teaches the basics of doing legal research and how to formulate legal arguments and write a convincing paper. Of course, once you have those basic skills, a whole range of exciting courses becomes available to you. For example, you can study how the international justice system works and dictators and war criminals like Muammar Gaddafi can be prosecuted in the International Criminal Court. Or you can look at how the EU regulates the conduct of companies to ensure that they do not create cartels and monopolies that could damage the interests of society. Another exciting opportunity is provided by the Moot Court course. This is an interactive course that involves debating and discussing topical legal issues. Students can see their argumentation skills improve considerably and it is often considered one of the more fun and informal ways of learning. Students who do well and are motivated have the chance to compete for the right to represent the university in various international mooting competitions around the world.

Skills developed during your studies

Students improve their writing and analytical skills throughout the studies and at the end of the three years they should be able to confidently write legal opinions and provide structured support for their positions. A mandatory internship makes sure that the students graduate with practical experience in the legal field. Students also learn how to tackle some of the most problematic disagreements and issues in modern society and morality. Law provides a framework through which to examine and understand different cultures and societies, so a law degree is a useful way to prepare not only for specific legal careers, but for a wide range of professional roles – and, indeed, for life in general.

Text by Tiina Pajuste (Tallinn University School of Governance, Law and Society).

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